What We’re Reading Now

May marks the end of the school year for many colleges, universities, and public schools across the country. But while they were winding down, we have been gearing up for a summer full of conferences, webinars and updates. But before we got too far into the summer mindset, we kept up with trending topics that rounded out the school year. From remediation issues colleges are facing, to the downside of e-books from a librarians perspective, to the new ‘digital divide’ that is popping up across the country, check out our top reads for this past month!

New ‘Digital Divide’ Seen in Wasting Time Online via NY Times In the 90s, the term ‘digitial divide’ emerged to describe technology’s haves and have-nots. It inspired many efforts to get the latest computing tools into the hands of all Americans, particularly low-income families. Those efforts have indeed shrunk the divide. But they created an unintended side effect, one that is surprising and troubling to researchers and policy makers and that the government now wants to fix.

Libraries Grapple With The Downside Of E-Books via NPR Digital books are the fastest growing area of publishing. Libraries are seeing a surge in demand for e-book titles as well, but there’s a downside. Most major publishers won’t allow libraries to lend their titles, while others impose restrictions or charge double or triple the print price.

Experts: Remedial College Classes Need Fixing via Education Week Each year, an estimated 1.7 million U.S. college students are steered to remedial classes to catch them up and prepare them for regular coursework. But a growing body of research shows the courses are eating up time and money, often leading not to degrees but student loan hangovers.

Online classes put the ‘cool’ back in ‘school’ via The Spectator With more jobs online and technology advancing seemingly every day, a basic degree is turning into only one of many options for employers. Online schools allow for individuals to have the choice of getting qualifications without much hassle.