Your Top Job Search Questions Answered

job search resources

Barbara Safani

Tutor.com’s popular Career Webinar Series featuring Barbara Safani, author and owner of Career Solvers, kicked off again this fall with a look at how to use online and print resources to search for a job.  About 100 different libraries participated and broadcast the webinar for their patrons.  We never seem to get to everyone’s question answered so Barbara was nice enough to answer the top 10 questions here.

1. What websites do you recommend for older job seekers?

There are some job boards that specialize in older job seekers such as Gray Matters. Eons is a social networking site that focuses on people who are 50+. It’s not a job board but it may be a place where you can network with other like-minded professionals.

2. If you have more than one specialty or resume, which one do you post on LinkedIn or any other database?

It’s best to create one profile that highlights your skills in a way that the intersection of your skill sets is clear. Spend some time reviewing your skills and list accomplishments in themed categories based on each skill set. In the specialties section of LinkedIn, categorize your skills into sets of related competencies to make it easier for your reader to understand the different types of skills you have.

3. Do you suggest the same search strategies for profit and non-profit job searching?

Yes. Regardless of your industry and function, generally the search process is the same. Research is a critical component of a successful search at every professional level.

4. How often are the lists on Simply Hired cleaned up and updated?

Since Simply Hired is an aggregator and not a database, the information is not static and it is reflective of the information posted by the originating job board. If a position has been filled and the originating job board has not removed this position from their site, Simply Hired has no way of removing the site. However each listing on Simply Hired notes when the position was posted on the originating job board and this gives the job seeker an idea of how “fresh” the job is.

5. How do you feel about employment agencies?

Employment agencies are a resource for job seekers and a viable component of an effective search. However, job seekers need to be clear on the role the employment agency plays in a search. Generally, employment agencies are interested in job seekers when they have an open job that is a strong match to that job seeker’s skills. They are usually not interested in candidates that don’t meet their immediate needs, have problematic or non-linear career histories, or career changers. Recruiters don’t work for job seekers. They work for the employer who has asked them to fill one or more of their open positions their loyalty generally lies with that employer and not with the individual job seeker.

6. What keywords are good to use on resumes?

Use the keywords that are most relevant for the jobs you are applying for. To find appropriate keywords, review job postings for positions that match you skill set and incorporate similar keywords into your resume.

7. How do you find part-time jobs?

The same way you find full-time employment. Research job boards and company websites for opportunities. Talk to your contacts and try to forge new relationships with new people who might be able to help you. Think strategically about the types of companies that are more likely to need part-time or seasonal workers. Review best companies lists to find companies that tout themselves as best employers for part-time work or other flexible work arrangements.

8. What are the best resources for information on private companies?

Hoovers, One Source, FTT Research, Vault, and Wet Feet all provide robust and comprehensive information on private companies.

9. How do you contact people on LinkedIn when access is restricted?

Review your list of contacts to determine who in your network is connected to the person you want to reach out to. Work through your web of contacts to source someone in your network that would be willing to make an introduction to the person you are trying to meet.

10. How do you find government jobs?

All government jobs are posted at www.usajobs.gov. Reach out to contacts that may be able to introduce you to people who work for the government to gain a perspective on what it’s like to work for the government.

All library clients are invited to participate in upcoming webinars also featuring Barbara Safani:   October 27th for Resume Writing and December 1st for Job Interviews.

2 Responses to Your Top Job Search Questions Answered

  1. M P October 27, 2010 at 4:37 PM #

    I really enjoyed the Webinar held today, and I would like more info re: any info for entry level positions in IT.

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